Countries || Interesting Stuff || Animals

Africa contains more countries than any other. There are about 53 countries in Africa. Look at the map of Africa. Can you find some countries that are part of Africa?

 

Countries of Africa

The peoples of Africa belong to several thousand different ethnic groups.

 
I am from Egypt. Egypt is a country in Africa.

 
Morocco is a country in Africa. People from Morocco are called Moroccans.

Jambo (hello) from Kenya! Kenya is a country in Africa.

Interesting facts, places to see, things to do in Africa!

 Africa is the second-largest continent. It has many different biomes, including

 desert,

This is the Sahara Desert. The Sahara Desert is the largest hot desert in the world!


grassy plains,

It's Tsavo National Park! Tsavo National Park is one of many protected wildlife areas in Africa. 

 
 

wetlands,

Africa's River Nile is the longest river in the world. It is 4,241 miles (6825 kilometers) long! 

 
 

and mountain areas.

Can you see Mt. Kilimanjaro in the background? Mt Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa. 

 

 

Animals of Africa

Many fascinating animals call the continent of Africa their home. Many people enjoy going on a safari in Africa's many national parks to see the wildlife. You never know what you'll see on safari!

Lions are large cats that live on grassy plains (savannas) in Africa.  
   
The African Elephant is the largest land animal.
   
Cape Buffalo are large, hoofed mammals that live in African savannas.  
   
The Rhino is a large, thick-skinned mammal that roams the hot, grassy plains in Africa.
   
Zebras are large, fast-running mammals that live on African grassy plains (savannas).  

 

Just for fun..
Take your own Virtual Safari through several of Africa's National Parks and take a glimpse of some of the wildlife found in these parks. While on your journey, you will be taking photos!

Want more information about Africa?

Check out:
CCSD'S The Continents: Africa

 

 

 

 

PICTURE CREDITS:

Nigel's World
Pics4Learning.com
Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia